Journal of Chemical Society of Nigeria https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn <p style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84); font-family: &amp;quot; noto sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;noto kufi arabic&amp;quot;,-apple-system,blinkmacsystemfont,&amp;quot;segoe ui&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;roboto&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;oxygen-sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;ubuntu&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;cantarell&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;helvetica neue&amp;quot;,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; margin-top: 0px; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px;">The journal of Chemical Society of Nigeria is a bimonthly publication of original research reports in pure and applied chemistry. Among our regulations include</p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84); font-family: &amp;quot; noto sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;noto kufi arabic&amp;quot;,-apple-system,blinkmacsystemfont,&amp;quot;segoe ui&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;roboto&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;oxygen-sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;ubuntu&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;cantarell&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;helvetica neue&amp;quot;,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px;">1) Manuscript submitted to this journal is not published and will not be simultaneously submitted or published elsewhere either in parts or whole. Again the author agrees that the copyright for his article is totally transferred to the Editorial Board of this Journal once the said article is accepted for publication</p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84); font-family: &amp;quot; noto sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;noto kufi arabic&amp;quot;,-apple-system,blinkmacsystemfont,&amp;quot;segoe ui&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;roboto&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;oxygen-sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;ubuntu&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;cantarell&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;helvetica neue&amp;quot;,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px;">2) Authors that work for organizations must obtain the written consent of their employer(s) prior to this publication</p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84); font-family: &amp;quot; noto sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;noto kufi arabic&amp;quot;,-apple-system,blinkmacsystemfont,&amp;quot;segoe ui&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;roboto&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;oxygen-sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;ubuntu&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;cantarell&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;helvetica neue&amp;quot;,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px;">3) By this agreement, the organization surrenders its copyright to this journal.</p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84); font-family: &amp;quot; noto sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;noto kufi arabic&amp;quot;,-apple-system,blinkmacsystemfont,&amp;quot;segoe ui&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;roboto&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;oxygen-sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;ubuntu&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;cantarell&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;helvetica neue&amp;quot;,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px;">4)No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored or transmitted in any form without the permission in writing from the copyright holder.</p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84); font-family: &amp;quot; noto sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;noto kufi arabic&amp;quot;,-apple-system,blinkmacsystemfont,&amp;quot;segoe ui&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;roboto&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;oxygen-sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;ubuntu&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;cantarell&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;helvetica neue&amp;quot;,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px;">While the Editorial Board makes every effort to ensure that no misleading information or statement appears in this journal. It is made clear herein that the data and information in the articles and advertisements are the responsibility of the contributor or advertiser concerned. Consequently, the Editorial board and their respective staff and agents accept no responsibility or liability whatsoever for the consequences of any such misleading data and/or information.</p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84); font-family: &amp;quot; noto sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;noto kufi arabic&amp;quot;,-apple-system,blinkmacsystemfont,&amp;quot;segoe ui&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;roboto&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;oxygen-sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;ubuntu&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;cantarell&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;helvetica neue&amp;quot;,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px;">©CHEMICAL SOCIETY OF NIGERIA (CSN)</p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84); font-family: &amp;quot; noto sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;noto kufi arabic&amp;quot;,-apple-system,blinkmacsystemfont,&amp;quot;segoe ui&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;roboto&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;oxygen-sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;ubuntu&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;cantarell&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;helvetica neue&amp;quot;,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px;"><strong> Prof. Joseph Anireju LORI</strong><sub>BSc, MSc, PhD, FCSN, FICCON, FRSC</sub></p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.84); font-family: &amp;quot; noto sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;noto kufi arabic&amp;quot;,-apple-system,blinkmacsystemfont,&amp;quot;segoe ui&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;roboto&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;oxygen-sans&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;ubuntu&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;cantarell&amp;quot;,&amp;quot;helvetica neue&amp;quot;,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px;"> Editor-in-Chief</p> en-US <p>Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/">Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 License</a> that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgment of the work’s authorship and initial publication in this journal.</p> csnjournal@gmail.com (Prof. Joseph Anireju LORI) webmaster@chemsociety.org.ng (webmaster) Tue, 27 Feb 2024 16:10:19 +0000 OJS 3.2.1.1 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 THERMODYNAMIC STUDIES OF THE INTERACTIONS OF CETYLTRIMETHYL AMMONIUM BROMIDE (CTAB) AND METHYL ORANGE DYE IN ETHANOL-WATER MIXED SOLVENTS https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/945 <p>The interaction between Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and Methyl Orange dye in water and ethanol-water mixed solvent media at varying temperatures was studied by conductometry. The critical micelle concentrations and thermodynamic parameters of micelle formation such as enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy were determined at different temperatures and volume fractions of ethanol. Results show that the CMC of CTAB increased with increasing volume fraction of ethanol indicating that the solubility of CTAB in aqueous solution may have decreased with increasing volume fraction of ethanol. The CMC of the surfactant solution also increased in the presence of the dye which may be attributed to steric hindrance due to the bulkiness of the azo dye. The increased CMC observed with temperature may suggest breakdown of structured water molecules surrounding the hydrophobic alkyl chain as well as increased molecular freedom of the surfactant molecules due to higher kinetic energy. The decreasing negative values of Gibbs free energy may indicate that micellization was thermodynamically feasible but less spontaneous on increasing volume fraction of ethanol, in the presence of the dye and with increasing temperature. However, temperature effect was not large. The enthalpy of the process shows that the interaction between the dye and surfactant was exothermic (?H 0m ? ? ) and the observed positive values of ?Sm is suggestive of entropy driven micellization process.&nbsp;</p> G. A. Cookey, C. B. Giomene, N. Boisa Copyright (c) 2024 G. A. Cookey, C. B. Giomene, N. Boisa https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/945 Tue, 27 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +0000 COMPARING KEY PHYSICAL PARAMETERS OF ARTISANAL AND REGULAR DPK AND PMS PRODUCTS IN RIVERS STATE-NIGERIA https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/946 <p>Refineries in Nigeria are producing below installed capacities and this has resulted in the inability to refine enough PMS and DPK to meet local consumption. This has led to increase in the activities of artisanal refining in the Niger Delta, which invariably adulterates the product. This study was aimed at comparing the physical parameters of artisanal with regular Premium Motor Spirit (PMS) and Dual-Purpose Kerosene (DPK) to compare their compliance with ASTM standards. The artisanal PMS and DPK samples were purchased, prepared and analyzed by SOP as stated by ASTM. The results obtained for PMS were: density of artisanal PMS (APMS) (0.768±0.00035) and regular PMS (RPMS) (0.764±0.00028), Reid vapour pressure (RVP) of APMS (27.67±2.52kPa) and RPMS (45.00±1.41kPa), specific gravity of APMS (0.769±0.0004) and RPMS (0.765±0.0003), Flash point of APMS (30±0.0010C) and RPMS (&lt;300C). Those of DPK were: density of artisanal DPK (ADPK) (0.820±0.0001) and regular DPK (RDPK) (0.787±0.420C), Specific gravity of ADPK (0.821±0.001) and RDPK (0.788±0.0001), RVP of ADPK (&lt;1KPa) and RDPK (&lt;1KPa), Flash point of ADPK (72.30±2.520C) and RDPK (75±2.830C). The findings revealed that specific gravity for both artisanal and regular PMS and DPK were within ASTM specification, while RVP for APMS was below ASTM specification but within ASTM specification for RPMS. Also, distillation ranges of APMS were above ASTM specification but were within ASTM specification for RPMS. Distillation ranges of ADPK before 90% were below ASTM specification but became above thereafter. Based on these findings, the study concludes that, the refining process of artisanal PMS and DPK may not have been appropriate or adulteration may have taken place which may cause problems in automotive engines, human health and the environment. However, this domestic innovation of refining can be upgraded to bring about improved quality of PMS and DPK.</p> M. S ABU-MADOJEMU, A. C MARCUS, O. M FRANK Copyright (c) 2024 M. S ABU-MADOJEMU, A. C MARCUS, O. M FRANK https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/946 Tue, 27 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +0000 ASSESSMENT OF PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF WATER FROM ELEME RIVER, SOUTH-SOUTH NIGERIA https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/947 <p>This study evaluated the physicochemical characteristics of water from the Eleme river in Rivers State, South-South Nigeria, to assess the water quality in the river. To determine pH, electrical conductivity (EC), total dissolved solids (TDS), total suspended solids (TSS), total solids (TS), dissolved oxygen (DO), five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), total organic carbon (TOC), chloride ion (Cl-), calcium ion (Ca2+), magnesium ion (Mg2+), and potassium ion (K+) using their standard methods, water samples were collected at two different points: station 1 (S1) and station 2 (S2). The results show that EC (1221, 1410 ?- 1cm-1), TSS (312.78, 372.01 mg/l), DO (6.09, 5.95 mg/l), Cl- (1056.41, 1056.89 mg/l) and K+ (15.24, 14.84 mg/l ) for S1 and S2 respectively were observed to be above the permissible limits recommended by some government regulatory bodies. pH of the water from S1 and S2 are 6.10 and 6.72 respectively which indicates that S1 water is below the permissible limits while S2 water is within the limits and TDS (611.09, 619.90 mg/l) for S1 and S2 respectively were within the permissible limits while TS (923.87, 991.00 mg/l), BOD5 (4.87, 4.92 mg/l), TOC (190.41, 112.01 mg/l), Ca2+ (30.90, 38.22) and Mg2+ (23.71, 28.41 mg/l) for S1 and S2 respectively were below the permissible limits. The study has shown that large volumes of untreated industrial effluents and toxicological chemicals released into the Eleme river were the primary cause of pollution loading, which was attributed to EC, TSS, DO, Cl-, and K+.</p> V. C. Okabekwa, R. U. Arinze, B. I. Tabugbo, V. N. Okafor Copyright (c) 2024 V. C. Okabekwa, R. U. Arinze, B. I. Tabugbo, V. N. Okafor https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/947 Tue, 27 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +0000 ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF CARBONIZED TITONIA DIVERSIFOLIA TOWARDS Cd2+ AND CU2+ UNDER DIFFERENT pH, ADSORPTION CAPACITY AND CONCENTRATION https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/948 <p>Adsorption studies were performed to investigate the adsorption capacity of carbonized Tithonia diversifolia towards heavy metal ions (Cd2+ and Cu2+) under different pH, contact time, concentration and temperature conditions. Cadmium metal concentrations at; 25 ppm, 50 ppm, 75 ppm, 100 ppm, 150 ppm and 200 ppm of metal solutions were prepared and the pH was adjusted to 5. The uptake of copper (II) increases as the pH of the solution increases; at pH 1, pH 2, pH 3, pH 4 and pH 5, percentage metal bound were 20.59, 48.47, 94.26 and 94.08% respectively, at pH 5 and pH 6, percentage metal bound dropped to 93.26, 92.62% respectively. The increase in the removal of copper as pH increases is attributed to the decrease in competition between proton and Cu2+ ion for the surface site. Cadmium study showed that the optimum binding pH is 5 while at pH 1, pH 2, pH 3, pH4 and pH 6, percentage bound were 25.59, 59.12, 96.76, 96.14 and 98.31% respectively. The percentage removal for cadmium (II) ion is low at pH 1 and remains high and almost constant at pH 6. The high binding power of cadmium (II) ion at the initial stage is attributed to the biomass having maximum binding sites available for interaction. Our findings showed that the amount of Cu+2 and Cd2+ adsorbed was found to vary with the initial solution pH, adsorbent dosage and concentration.</p> K. A. Olaifa, J.O. Olaifa, A. O. Agbeja, D. R. Akindolu, A.O. Olaitan, M.S. Akinlade Copyright (c) 2024 K. A. Olaifa, J.O. Olaifa, A. O. Agbeja, D. R. Akindolu, A.O. Olaitan, M.S. Akinlade https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/948 Tue, 05 Mar 2024 00:00:00 +0000 BIOGAS PRODUCTION POTENTIAL FROM ANAEROBIC CO-DIGESTION OF FOOD WASTE AND ANIMAL MANURE https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/949 <p>The potential of biogas production by the anaerobic codigestion (AcoD) of canteen food waste and animal manure was investigated using the biochemical methane potential assay (BMP). The BMP assay was conducted under thermophilic temperature of 35 °C in a batch process at digestion time of 40 d. Waste substrate mixture was digested at a fixed proportion of 1:1 with different animal manure as co-substrate. Maximum cumulative biogas production (418 ml g-1 VS) was achieved during codigestion of food waste with pig manure &gt; chicken manure (408 ml g-1 VS) &gt; goat manure (319 ml g-1 VS). Generally, all manure codigested reactors produced 1.01 to 1.34 times more biogas than food waste alone indicating the synergistic effect of codigestion on overall biogas productivity. With analogous increase in biogas production, manure amendment produced significant (p&lt;0.05) substrate biodegradation in terms of total and volatile solids loss. The microbial load profile prior and post-AD revealed significant reduction (p&lt;0.05)in microbial species suggestion that anaerobic digestion can be adopted as a method of waste treatment and hygienization.</p> U. A. Ofon, U. U. Ndubuisi-Nnaji, I. M. Udo, E. S. Udofia, OK Fatunla, S. E. Shaibu Copyright (c) 2024 U. A. Ofon, U. U. Ndubuisi-Nnaji, I. M. Udo, E. S. Udofia, OK Fatunla, S. E. Shaibu https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/949 Tue, 05 Mar 2024 00:00:00 +0000 SOLID-PHASE FRACTIONATION OF HEAVY METAL IONS IN SOILS FROM MUNICIPAL WASTE DUMPSITE IN PORT HARCOURT, NIGERIA https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/950 <p>In many cities across the developing countries solid wastes are disposed indiscriminately without recourse to the human health risk. Heavy metals found in solid wastes may likely be released into the environment via flood runoff. To assess whether the contaminants can affect the groundwater, soil samples were collected for analysis in two seasons – dry and wet seasons. To determine level of the metals in the soil matrix, the samples were subjected to acid digestion followed by atomic absorption spectroscopy analysis. The different solid-phases associated with heavy metals were evaluated from the soil samples by using sequential extraction method. The geo-accumulation index and mobility factor were considered to assess the level of contamination and migration of the metals present in the soil. The soil metal contents strongly correlated with the soil pH and organic matter. The exchangeable fraction has Cr &gt; Pb &gt; Co in the order of its mobility in the soil, whilst in the residual fraction suggesting the most immobile species with Pb &gt; Co &gt; Cr &gt; Ni present in the soil. The geo-accumulation index showed that the degree of pollution of the dumpsite during the dry and wet seasons was mostly unpolluted. The study indicates that the metals of interest may not likely pose environmental risk due to their relatively low concentrations and the chemical species in which they exist in soil.</p> C. C. Obunwo, S. C. Ubah, O. S. Bull , P. M. Amaibi Copyright (c) 2024 C. C. Obunwo, S. C. Ubah, O. S. Bull , P. M. Amaibi https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/950 Tue, 05 Mar 2024 00:00:00 +0000 ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF CAMEROUN ZINC, STONE-COATED TILES, ASBESTOS, CORRUGATED IRON ROOFS AND GALVANIZED IRON TANK ON HARVESTED RAINWATER IN SOUTH-SOUTH, RIVERS STATE, NIGERIA USING WATER QUALITY INDEX https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/952 <p>Harvested rainwater has shown lots of benefits in the universe including providing water in remote areas for their approximately safe usage and it also supports the global water demands due to inadequate amount of water supply for utilization. This present study was aimed at analyzing the impact of various roofing materials, galvanized iron tank and industrial activity on rainwater quality by determining the physicochemical characteristics, bacteriological properties and the metal composition of the roof types and storage medium. Rainwater was harvested from Cameroun zinc, stone-coated tiles, asbestos, corrugated iron roofs run-offs, and stored rainwater in galvanized iron tank and directly from the sky (control) in the urban and rural areas of Rivers State between the months of April-July, 2018. The results will be compared with the standards (NAFDAC, USEPA, WHO and NSDWQ) for drinking water quality and Water Quality Index (WQI) ratings since there is no standard for rainwater quality. Roofs ages from &lt;5, 5-10, 15-20, and &gt;25 years in service conditions and stored rainwater in storage vessels for the duration of one year and above were considered. Heavy metals were analyzed using Flame-AAS; other parameters were analyzed using standard methods. The WQI ratings were calculated using the weighted arithmetic method. Results obtained in both areas gave mean values ranging from 6.10-6.90 for pH, Temp., (20.00-28.00 oC), EC (17.00-132.00 µ?/cm), E. coli (no detection). Other results (mg/L) were; TDS (15.50-71.67), TSS (19.00- 84.67), Pb (0.00-0.23), Cr (0.00-0.12), Zn (0.01-0.03), Fe (0.01-0.22) and Al (0.00-1.61).The WQI ratings gave excellent water to unfit for drinking water quality in both areas. Generally, harvested rainwater is not free of contaminations because of its catchment/storage systems due to atmospheric pollution and leaching of the roofing material; hence, it should be treated before being used for domestic and potable usages.</p> E. S. Nicholas, P. O. Ukoha Copyright (c) 2024 E. S. Nicholas, P. O. Ukoha https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/952 Tue, 05 Mar 2024 00:00:00 +0000 ADSORTION POTENTIAL OF GARLIC, GINGER AND LEMON IN THE REMOVAL OF HEAVY METALS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/953 <p>This work was conducted to assess the efficiency of Garlic, Ginger and Lemon in the removal of some Heavy Metals from aqueous solution. Batch adsorption process was employed in the experiments. Different dosages (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0) g of the adsorbents and concentrations of the heavy metals (1000ppm, 800ppm, 600ppm, 400ppm, and 200ppm) were prepared and used. Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopic (FAAS) was used to determine the amount of heavy metal concentrations adsorbed at each stage of the experiment. Results obtained show that there was remarkable reduction of metal concentrations in the solutions. However, comparatively, the efficiency of garlic in absorbing the metals is greater than that of ginger and lemon at all conditions. Thus, results obtained suggest that Garlic, Ginger and Lemon could be promising adsorbents for heavy metal removal in aqueous solutions, but garlic has greater efficiency in adsorbing the metals particularly zinc and copper.</p> G. A. Cookey, B. L. Tambari , D. P. Wokocha Copyright (c) 2024 G. A. Cookey, B. L. Tambari , D. P. Wokocha https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/953 Tue, 05 Mar 2024 00:00:00 +0000 KINETICS AND MECHANISM MODELLING OF Pb(II) AND Ni(II) IONS SORPTION FROM AQUEOUS MEDIUM: EVALUATING THE PERFORMANCE OF Curcuma longa RHIZOME IN THE TREATMENT OF WASTE WATER. https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/954 <p>In this research Curcuma longa Rhizome, an agricultural product, available in large quantity in northern Nigeria, were used as low-cost adsorbent for removal of Pb(II) and Ni(II) ions from aqueous medium. Batch operation was used to study the equilibrium behaviour of Curcuma longa rhizome. The effect of solution pH, and contact time on the adsorbent for the removal of Pb(II) and Ni(II) ions were evaluated. To study the adsorption kinetics of Pb(II) and Ni(II) ions onto Curcuma longa Rhizome, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order as well as three diffusion models: intraparticle diffusion model (Weber and Morris model), film diffusion model (McKay model) and liquid film Models were used. The sorption kinetics can be described well by the pseudo-second-order model due to the closeness between the qexp ( 49.26 mg/g) and qcal (52.63 mg/g) for Pb(II) and qexp (57.60) and qcal (55.56 mg/g) for Ni(II) ions. Moreover, the rate limiting step are liquid film and intraparticle diffusion controlled. In addition, the results suggest that Curcuma longa Rhizomes are very effective adsorbent for the removal of Pb(II) and Ni(II) ions from aqueous medium. This will serve as an indicator to consider in the design for waste water treatment plant for heavy metal detoxification using Curcuma longa Rhizome.</p> O. K. Amadi, C. Odih, O. U. Nwachukwu Copyright (c) 2024 O. K. Amadi, C. Odih, O. U. Nwachukwu https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/954 Wed, 20 Mar 2024 00:00:00 +0000 AN OVERVIEW ON THE SYNTHESIS OF PHOSPHORYLATED CHITOSAN DERIVATIVES FOR THE ADSORPTION OF EMERGING CONTAMINANTS IN WATER https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/955 <p>Safe water for human consumption and for aquatic life is of paramount importance. The emergence of new kinds of contaminants like surfactants, pharmaceutical drugs, hormones, foods and additives, laundry detergents, etc., are posing new and serious challenges to the conventional primary and secondary waste water treatment, because of the inability to remove or degrade these toxic pollutants efficiently and hence, the need for cost effective tertiary treatment method. Adsorption is a promising method worldwide for the removal of emerging contaminants, since it is highly-efficient and has a simple operating system. This review seeks to investigate the suitable preparation methods of soluble phosphorylated chitosan derivatives as efficient adsorbent for effective removal of emerging contaminants in water. Hence, the goal of this study, is to review some synthesis of the phosphates of chitosan under various chemical conditions to produce soluble chitosan derivatives which can be effectively used for the removal of emerging contaminants in water by adsorption technique.</p> M. O. Ekeoma, B. C. Oleleme, S. Sabar Copyright (c) 2024 M. O. Ekeoma, B. C. Oleleme, S. Sabar https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/955 Wed, 20 Mar 2024 00:00:00 +0000 ISOLATION, CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIMYCOBACTERIAL POTENCY OF A FURAN DERIVATIVE FROM THE CHLOROFORM CRUDE EXTRACT OF Icacina trichantha oliv TUBER. https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/956 <p>Spectroscopic analysis of a pure isolate (OAU 2, a furan derivative) by column chromatography from the chloroform crude extract of Icacina trichantha tuber was done using FT-IR, 1HNMR, 13CNMR, COSY and was established by literature as well as the investigation of antimycobacterial potency. This anitmycobacterial activity revealed that this isolate actually has activity against DR-TB Strain and H37RV Strain which are American type culture collection strain and multi-drug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis being the test organisms. Hence, confirming the folk believe of the use of I. trichantha tuber in the treatment of “serious cough”</p> O. U. Akoh, B. C. Anyanwu, O. M. Mac-kalunta Copyright (c) 2024 O. U. Akoh, B. C. Anyanwu, O. M. Mac-kalunta https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://journals.chemsociety.org.ng/index.php/jcsn/article/view/956 Wed, 20 Mar 2024 00:00:00 +0000